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Flashback: Toys We Heart

Flashback: Toys We Heart

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    Before the Playstation and Wii, toys that talk, and toys that walk, we had a million toys that were simple, yet effective. Let's take a look back at some of the classic toys of the 70's and 80's!
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    The Big Wheel. It was usually made of plastic, with an oversized front wheel, and rides very low to the ground. Kind of like a low-rider tricycle!
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    Big Jim was a popular line of action figure toys produced from 1972 through 1986 by Mattel. Originally inspired by G.I. Joe, the Big Jim line was smaller in size and each figure included a push button in the back that made the character execute a karate chop action. Hai-Ya!!
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    The Six Million Dollar Man was a popular television show in the 70s, and with popularity comes action figures! The 12-inch tall Steve Austin action figure marketed by Kenner in the mid-1970s...
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    ...intact Six Million Dollar Man and Bionic Woman toys continue to attract premium prices on the collector's market! Other toys in the series included the Bionic Transport and Repair Station...
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    ...and the inflatable secret headquarters.
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    The Evel Knievel Stunt Bike consisted of a replica Evel Knievel with his bike and a red box with a handle. The rear wheel of the bike plugged into the box and turning the handle spun a flywheel inside the box which made a revving sounds and spun the rear wheel. Then press the button and watch him go...
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    ...the Evel Knievel Scramble Van with jumping ramp.
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    Bullet Man was a spin off of Action Man. Atomic Man and Commando Tom Stone were also additions.
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    The initial G.I. Joe product offered four of the branches of the U.S. armed forces with the Soldier (Army), Action Sailor (Navy), Action Pilot (Air Force) and Action Marine (Marines). The development of G.I. Joe led to the coining of the term 'action figure' instead of dolls!
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    The magic hat had a hidden compartment and could magically squirt water. Every kid wants to be a magician!
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    Star Trek was of course an extremely popular show in the 70's, and beyond! This Star Trek Phaser toy was a huge success. It was simply a flashlight that you instered discs into it which would then be projected onto a wall, or person, or anything else you wanted to!
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    Space: 1999 is a British science-fiction television series that originally aired from 1975 to 1977. As with most television shows, this one spawned numerous toys!
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    No surprise that the Earthquake Tower sold well during the era of disaster movies...
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    ...watch out below!!
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    Every kid loves Hot Wheels, but the "Sizzlers" were even cooler. Maybe these rechargeable electric cars were one of the first steps to real rechargeable electric cars!
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    SSP Smash-Up Derby was made by Kenner. The set included 2 cars: the '57 Chevy Nomad (blue) and the '57 Ford (red) as well as two black ramps and two T-Handle Power Sticks...
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    ...The 1st issue cars had white trigger mechanisms that stuck out from the front of the cars. When the cars collided, this trigger pushed in, and unleashed the spring-loaded part holders
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    Gnip Gnop is a two-player table-top game in which the players try get all 6 balls to the opponent's side first.
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    Which Witch? came out in 1970. The board is 3-D and shaped like a haunted house. Drawing cards freezes or unfreezes players' pawns on the track, or instructs players to drop a metal "whammy ball" into the chimney, which falls randomly into one of the four rooms and knocks players' pawns off the track.
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    Wooly Willy is a toy in which metal filings are moved about with a magnetic wand to add features to a cartoon face. Always fun, but somewhat annoying, this toy is still popular today.
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    Everyone loved the film Planet of the Apes in the 70s, and you could run your own planet of apes with General Urko, Cornelius and Dr. Zaius, pictured here!
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    Simon came out in 1978 at Studio 54 in New York City and became an icon of the 1980s. Simple and easy, you just follow Simon's pattern exactly. If you miss, you lose!
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    KerPlunk originally was released in 1967. With just a few parts to the game, the goal was to use remove straws one by one and not let the ball drop to the bottom of the tube. Harder than it sounds!
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    Slot cars came prior to RC cars. They ran on tracks by slots they fit into. You could race your friends! RC cars made Slot cars obsolete.
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    Mousetrap was originally released in 1963, but is still popular today. In 2006, the game was re-released in the United Kingdom with a completely new design. There are now three mousetraps: the board and plastic components are completely different.
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    Jaws was a huge success in theaters, so of course they released a game. The players put junk pieces in the shark's mouth. Afterwards each player takes out of Jaws's mouth with a gaff hook. The first player to successfully remove four junk pieces wins. However, if a player takes a wrong move, Jaws's mouth will snap shut.
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    Lawn Darts, or Jarts, 12 inches (30 cm) long with a weighted metal or plastic tip on one end and three plastic fins on a rod at the other end. On December 19, 1988, the Consumer Product Safety Commission banned lawn darts from sale in the United States