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Banned from Saturday Night Live

Over the years, Saturday Night Live has famously banned several celebrities from appearing on the show.

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    Sinead O'Connor - After her musical guest appearance on October 3, 1992, O'Connor held up a photo of Pope John Paul II while singing the word "evil." Afterwards, she tore the photo into pieces and said "Fight the real enemy." Reruns of the episode have been edited to show the performance from the dress rehearsal that night. Photo: YouTube
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    Adrien Brody - As SNL host on May 10, 2003, Brody introduced Jamaican reggae musical guest, Sean Paul while wearing fake dreadlocks. SNL producer Lorne Michael notoriously hates unscripted performances. Photo: YouTube
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    Andy Kaufmann - In 1983, the executive producer of SNL decided to ask the audience if they wanted Kaufmann to return to the show. Viewers were encouraged to call one of two '900' numbers to vote. The result was to kick Kaufmann off the show. A year later, he died from lung cancer which spread to his brain. Photo: Everett Collection
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    Steven Seagal - Seagal hosted SNL on April 20, 1991. According to producer Lorne Michaels, Seagal is the biggest jerk to ever be on the show, not "playing nice" with the cast and crew. Photo: Getty Images
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    Chevy Chase - A member of the original SNL cast - and the first-ever anchor of 'Weekend Update,' Chevy is the first former cast memeber to have been banned from hosting the show. Chase returned to host SNL eight times since he left the show, but was notorious for his highly verbally abusive treatment of the rest of the case. He was also banned for the suggestion of an insensitive sketch involving gay cast member Terry Sweeney, involving Sweeney having AIDS. Photo: Getty Images
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    Cypress Hill - As musical guest on October 2, 1993, Cyrpress Hill lit up a marijuana joint on-air. They also trashed their instruments on stage. Photo: Getty Images
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    The Replacements - Similar to Cypress Hill, The Replacements did not follow the strict drugs and alcohol policy on January 18, 1986. Though band members appeared intoxicated while on-stage, the ban from SNL began when lead singer Paul Westerberg cursed on live television. Photo: Getty Images
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    Martin Lawrence - Lawrence hosted SNL on February 19, 1994. During his opening monologue, he pointed out the racial makeup of the audience, shared his views on "90s women" - especially their declining feminine hygiene habits. Reruns of the episode have been edited to include on-screen text that apologizes for Lawrence's comments and delicately describes why that portion of the monologue was edited. Photo: Getty Images
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    Martin Lawrence - Part 1 of the on-screen text that was edited into reruns of Lawrence's opening monologue. Photo: Hulu/Buzzfeed
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    Martin Lawrence - Part 2 of the on-screen text that was edited into reruns of Lawrence's opening monologue. Photo: Hulu/Buzzfeed
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    Frank Zappa - Zappa was banned from SNL in 1978 after a terrible hosting job. He deliberately mugged for the camera and announced to the audience that he was reading from cue cards. Photo: Everett Collection
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    Elvis Costello - For his musical performance in 1977, Costello was instructed by SNL (and his record label) to play his hit "Less Than Zero" - which he did, for about 5 seconds. He stopped his band and instead performed the politically-charged and anti-media song, "Radio, Radio." Photo: Getty Images
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    Milton Berle - Though a comedic and acting legend, Berle was banned from SNL after his April 14, 1979 hosting appearance. He reportedly took control over the whole show, upstaged the cast members and went off-script. Photo: Everett Collection
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    Charles Grodin - Grodin ad-libbed much of his performance during his hosting gig on October 29, 1977. He also broke character during a sketch which led to his ban from the show. Photo: Getty Images